Follow us on Facebook

One on One Support

Health Concerns
VA Issues  


Information:
Notice: Website under construction,
Contact
HCVets@gmail.com  
 

May 2014 VA Hep C Treatment Guidelines
UPDATE: Feb 26, 2016-
Funding and Prioritization Status Update

UPDATE: March 2016
VA Hep C Treatment Guidelines
VA to treat all vets in system
 

By Judith Graham
VA Extends New Hepatitis C Drugs to All Veterans in Its Health System

 
Orange Count Registry
Vietnam vets blame 'jet guns' for their hepatitis C
By Lily Leung Feb. 14, 2016 
 
CBS News Investigates
Congress outraged over hepatitis C treatment VA can't afford
Dr. Raymond Schinazi played a leading role developing a drug that cures hepatitis C while working seven-eighths of his time for the VA
 
ibtimes.com| By amynordrum
 


Hepatitis C drug costing VA, DoD millions
By Patricia Kime, Staff writer
We're looking at a company who is milking a cash cow for everything it's worth," Sanders said. 
 


VA to outsource care for 180,000 vets with hepatitis C
Dennis Wagner, The Arizona Republic 12:27 a.m. EDT June 21, 2015
 


VA to outsource care for 180,000 vets with hepatitis C
, The Republic | azcentral.com 11:51 a.m. MST June 19, 2015
Dr. David Ross, the VA's director public-health pathogens programs, resigned from the working group. "I cannot in good conscience continue to work on a plan for rationing care to veterans," he wrote.
 


VA Region Stops Referring Patients To Outside Hospitals Thanks To Budget Shortfall
Michael Volpe Contributor ...According to a memo — the entire region has been forced to stop all “non-VA care” referrals due to a budget shortfall.
 

DisabledVeterans.org
OIG INVESTIGATES VA CHOICE PROGRAM PROBLEMS
Sen. Mark Kirk admitted the VA Choice Program is a failed joke in a letter to Secretary Bob McDonald despite attempts to fix it.
 

 
Denied Hep C VA dental care?
Please click here

 
Dried Hepatitis C Blood Exposure 11/23/2013 Weeks later inconspicuous blood transmits virus and more likely to cause accidental exposures to Hep C
 

Lack of Standards for
Mass Vaccinations
1970 Jetgun Nursing Instructions
 

2014 AASLD Study Hepatitis C not an STD

Home
Test the Rest Campaign
Documentation & Surveillance Alerts
Military Hepatitis History  
Understanding The Liver 
VA Flow Sheet for Cirrhosis
VA Defines Risk Factors
 
Hep C & Pro-Prebiotic
Need to know-Grassroots Research
 
Blog Another12Weeks
One Vets' Journey Though Treatment
 

 Ask NOD
 What Would Veterans Do?
Blog for VA Claims
 


Help with VA Claims
 


 
Info: Plan Backfires-
VBA Fast Letter Boost Claims
 
Legal- Fed Regs state:
Judge decision may be relied upon
Cotant v. Principi, 17 Vet.App. 116, 134 (2003),
 
Service Connected Claims
# 1 Conclusion of Law 
# 2 Conclusion of Law 
 
More Claims
Jetgun Decisions
Hep C Decisions
 
Search Board of Appeals Website
BVA Jetgun Decisions
BVA Hepatitis C Decisions

Great Advice!  
After the jetgun win
What to do next

 

 


Jury sides with hepatitis C victim
By Guillermo Contreras
San Antonio Express-News
Web Posted :
12/04/2003 12:00 AM

A Bexar County jury awarded a woman $551,600 Wednesday after finding she likely contracted hepatitis C from a San Antonio-area business that performs permanent cosmetic applications.

While medical studies have linked the often-fatal virus to tattoo parlors and related permanent cosmetic businesses, the lawsuit is believed to be the first time nationally that the issue has gone to trial, allowing a jury to make the link, state and national health experts said.

"We have no confirmed records of hepatitis C being transmitted at a licensed studio, so we're certainly interested in this case," said John Gower, director of programs for drugs and cosmetics at the Texas Department of Health in Austin.

The jury found John Shumate, owner of Permanent Cosmetics by John Shumate at 6111 Broadway, and his daughter Julie negligent for infecting Deborah Anderson, who received a series of permanent coloring touch-ups to her lips at the studio, mostly in 1999.

Anderson, 52, learned she had hepatitis C in February 2000 when a blood bank rejected her donation, according to her lawyers.

During an earlier donation, she did not have the virus.

She complained to the state Department of Health, and an inspection of the business found several violations, including dirty floors in the tattooing area, employees not washing their hands between applications, and incorrect or insufficient labeling of sterilized equipment.

"The jury has sent out a message to the public about the seriousness of the health issues involved with tattooing," said LoAn Vo, one of Anderson's lawyers.

Neither Shumate nor his attorney, John Wennermark, returned calls seeking comment.

Roger Sanchez, an epidemiologist with the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, said getting hepatitis C from a business is rare.

He added that "it's difficult to prove, but it's not impossible."

The case bolsters a study done 10 years ago by researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas that found most hepatitis C cases in Texas — 30 percent — were transmitted through commercial tattooing.

Dr. Robert Haley, an epidemiologist who formerly worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the state uses a different standard in determining infections. A person may not know for years after his initial infection that he is carrying hepatitis C, and he can't isolate the tattooing as the likely cause, he said.

"This was the perfect case because you have a lady with no other risk factors," said Haley, who testified for the plaintiff and was the author of the study. "She has a very low-risk lifestyle ... so she has no (other) reason to get hepatitis C."

At trial, Anderson's lawyers introduced evidence of violations at Shumate's studio. A state investigator noticed topical drugs to numb pain that required a prescription or licensed medical practitioner to apply them. Shumate does not have a medical license, according to the state report.

The inspector also observed three tattoo artists providing services for three hours, but none washed his or her hands between tattoo applications on separate clients, the investigator's report said.

The report also noted Shumate complained about the inspection process.

"Mr. Shumate stated that this is just another way that big government is trying to put him out of business," the report said. "He stated that there are some things that the government has no business regulating."